POP3 – Delete Immediately

This post is part of series documenting extensions I’ve designed and prototyped for the POP3 protocol. I originally had this idea on the way to designing a mechanism for keeping connections open and avoid having to close and reopen them. I had abandoned this specific idea early on in that process but once I started writing up my notes for public discussion, I realised this small update might still be useful to implement.

DELI

To delete a message with POP3, you’d normally use a DELE command which flags a message for deletion, followed by a QUIT command, which together with closing a connection, finally deletes those flagged messages.

The DELI command, in contrast, is a command to immediately delete the specified message. Once the server has responded with a +OK response, the delete request has been committed and you don’t need a QUIT.

“I’m not going to tell you again!”

The aftermath…

I originally wrote this extension as part of effort to allow opened connections to be shelved and refreshed. The QUIT command had the job of committing message delete requests but also shut down the underlying connection. My first thought in addressing that was client’s needed a way to delete messages without having to QUIT.

Seemed simple at first. Have an alternative form of DELE that doesn’t need a QUIT. It would be just like deleting a file on an FTP server. Simple!

The problem is what happens to the other messages after one has been deleted. POP3 works by assigned each message a numeric ID from 1 to n. In a world where deletes are deferred to the end of a connection, the view of a mailbox remains consistent throughout the lifespan of a connection. Now, we’re introducing committed deletes, what happens to those numeric message IDs?

There are two realistic alternatives. Servers could either leave a gap in the IDs so all the messages have consistent IDs, or the server could reduce all the higher IDs by one. I didn’t like either of those answers as either way might very realistically require a significant refactoring of the various server implementations out there.

This was why I initially decided against going down this road. It was only when I started putting my notes together for posterity that I realised this idea might still have legs.

Delete by Unique ID

Researching this extension, I came across the POP4 proposal. While this project seemed all but abandoned, it did have an idea I liked, which I’ve adapted back into a POP3 extension.

With this extension too, suddenly a “Delete Immediately” command becomes practical.

C: UIDL
S: +OK Unique IDs follow...
S: 1 XYZ_1001
S: 2 XYZ_1002
S: 3 XYZ_1003
S: .
C: RETR UID:XYZ_1001
S: +OK Message follows...
(Contents removed for brevity.)
S: .
C: DELI UID:XYZ_1001
S: +OK Message deleted and delete committed.

Earlier, I mused that there were two realistic ways to deal with numeric message IDs, either leave a gap in the numbers or fill the gap by reducing the others by one. But what if we don’t care what those numbers are because now we’re only making requests by string unique IDs?

This way a server implementing DELI is free to do what they wish with its numeric message IDs. The RFC would state something along the lines of “After a client has used a DELI command, it MUST NOT send any command that uses a numeric message-id parameter.”

With a wave of RFC 2119 magic, the problem goes away. You can have an immediate delete that’s instantly acknowledged, you just need to completely abandon the numeric message ID. That shouldn’t be too tricky,

billpg.com

Right?

Please do have a read of the posts in this series of POP3 extensions.

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